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  • News5

    Travel Go globetrotting with our exclusive travel pieces. From year abroad anecdotes to raving recommendations, it can all be found right here. NEW POST! YEAR ABROAD TALES: WORKING IN AN ART GALLERY ON THE ESTONIAN-RUSSIAN BORDER 11 Jun 2024 Year Abroad Tales: Working in an art gallery on the Estonian-Russian border Juliet shares her experience working at an eclectic art residence in Narva, Estonia, during her year abroad. Read More 11 Apr 2024 Exploring the history of the Vikings in Scandinavia, Part 2 – Stockholm & Copenhagen In the second part of their article, Aidan, a final year Hispanic Studies & History student with a love for all things Anglo-Saxon and Viking, shares the best places to explore the incredible history of the Vikings in Stockholm and Copenhagen. Read More 26 Mar 2024 Staycations: What Does the UK Have to Offer? We're all going on a summer holiday! Emma recommends some of her top staycation destinations for a jolly holiday here in the UK. Read More 26 Mar 2024 Exploring the history of the Vikings in Scandinavia, Part 1 – Oslo Aidan, a final year Hispanic Studies & History student with a love for all things Anglo-Saxon and Viking, shares their recommendations for the best places to explore the incredible history of the Vikings in Scandinavia in this two-part article. First up: Oslo Read More 9 Feb 2024 How Artificial Intelligence is Revolutionising the Tourism Experience Discover how AI is reshaping the world of travel, offering personalized recommendations, optimized route planning, and enhanced customer service. From predictive pricing to language translation apps, AI is breaking down barriers, fostering cultural sensitivity, and ensuring smart luggage solutions for a safer and more enjoyable journey. Read More 8 Feb 2024 In the middle of nowhere, but on the way to somewhere! During my road trip around America, I tried to get to Cadillac Ranch in Texas. The only thing between me and the Cadillacs was a ghost town in Oklahoma, an angry evangelical, and the great emptiness of America. Read More 1 2 3 4 5 1 ... 1 2 3 4 5 6 ... 6 Meet the Editor

  • Global Affairs

    Global Affairs Stay up-to-date with our top stories of political and social interest. Featuring the big headlines, bite-size pieces and language orientated news. NEW POST! THE FORGOTTEN VICTIMS OF THE HOLOCAUST 17 Jun 2024 The Forgotten Victims of the Holocaust With the arrival of Pride Month, Olivia reflects on those throughout history who have suffered due to their sexual orientation. Gay men living under National Socialism are often forgotten when remembering those who were persecuted by the Nazis. CW: mentions of the Holocaust and homophobia Read More 25 May 2024 Students Protest the (Western) World Over Student protests in the US in support of Palestine have grabbed international media attention, both from traditional new outlets and through the slow seep of videos in the TikTok ecosystem. The role of student journalists and social media in local and global politics has never been quite so clear. Holly explores this and examines the ongoing events. Read More 18 Apr 2024 The Reintroduction of the Eastern Black Rhino in Kenya After more than 50 years, the Eastern Black Rhino returns to a central Kenyan plateau. Editor in Chief, Harriet, dives into the details of this incredible conservationist effort. Read More 18 Apr 2024 Ladies Lounge: The Story of One Man’s Entitlement and Why That’s The Point The Ladies’ Lounge installation at the Museum of Old and New Art (MONA) in Tasmania has drawn international attention recently, as one man launched a gender discrimination complaint after being turned away from the women-only exhibit. Holly Cromwell reports. Read More 10 Apr 2024 Cannabis Legalisation in Germany Welfare Officer Liv looks into the recent legalisation of cannabis in Germany. CW: drugs Read More 5 Apr 2024 'A Victory for Feminism': How France Made the Right to Abortion Part of its Constitution In near direst response to the shift some countries have made towards restricting the right and access to safe abortions, France has become the first ever country to explicitly include abortion as a "guaranteed freedom" in its constitution, but this hasn't been without its struggles. CW: abortion Read More 1 2 3 1 ... 1 2 3 ... 3 Meet the Editor Emma is our Current Affairs Editor for 2023-24. She is a second year International Media and Communications student and aspiring journalist. She loves being a part of Lingo as it allows her to combine her passion for arts, cultures and languages with writing articles.

  • Language & Linguistics | Lingo Magazine

    Language Unique pieces for the inquisitive lovers of language and linguistics. NEW POST! INTERVIEW WITH A POLYGLOT 10 Jun 2024 Interview with a Polyglot Ever wondered how someone can manage learning and speaking multiple languages at once? Our Language & Linguistics editor, Charlie, got talking to UoN alum, Emily, to figure out just that. Read More 12 Apr 2024 Japanese: One Language, Three Writing Systems Japanese is one of the linguistically furthest languages from English, and its three writing systems are no exception. Let's take a quick walk through the history behind them and how they work harmoniously together. Read More 11 Apr 2024 The Influence of Arabic on the Spanish Language 700 years of Islamic rule in Al-Andalus has left its footprint on the Spanish language. Read More 13 Feb 2024 My Journey with Language Learning An exploration of my journey through language learning and my changing relationship with language through the school system. Read More 26 Jan 2024 The Language Taking Over the World: English as a Lingua Franca As the English language clings onto its lingua franca status, what does this mean for the rest of the world? Is English a threat to other languages? Or is its growth an inevitable effect of globalisation? Emma Burnett discusses. Read More 31 Dec 2023 Words of the Year 2023 Love a bit of lexical fun? Let's take a look at the major dictionaries' choices for Word of the Year 2023. Read More 1 2 3 4 1 ... 1 2 3 4 ... 4 Meet the Editor A nerd in every sense, Charlie is this year's Language and Linguistics editor. She recently graduated in Modern Languages with Translation Studies, including a year spent in Paris, and is now working towards an MA in Translation Studies. She speaks French and has just started learning Japanese! In her spare time, she plays video games, watches movies, and spends plenty of time with her two gerbils.

  • Home | Lingo Magazine

    Home: Welcome LATEST ARTICLES GLOBAL AFFAIRS The Forgotten Victims of the Holocaust With the arrival of Pride Month, Olivia reflects on those throughout history who have suffered due to their sexual orientation. Gay men living under National Socialism are often forgotten when remembering those who were persecuted by the Nazis. CW: mentions of the Holocaust and homophobia TRAVEL Year Abroad Tales: Working in an art gallery on the Estonian-Russian border Juliet shares her experience working at an eclectic art residence in Narva, Estonia, during her year abroad. LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS Interview with a Polyglot Ever wondered how someone can manage learning and speaking multiple languages at once? Our Language & Linguistics editor, Charlie, got talking to UoN alum, Emily, to figure out just that. GLOBAL AFFAIRS Students Protest the (Western) World Over Student protests in the US in support of Palestine have grabbed international media attention, both from traditional new outlets and through the slow seep of videos in the TikTok ecosystem. The role of student journalists and social media in local and global politics has never been quite so clear. Holly explores this and examines the ongoing events. Home: Latest News Our Monthly Music Chart! Tune in to all our favourite songs from around the world! Listen now! Home: Feature Story Join us Not a member yet? Why not? Click the link below to buy our membership and unlock all of perks of being part of Lingo! Membership > Get an Idea Stuck for an idea? Have a look through our database curated by our excellent editors for some inspiration! Database > Start Writing Can't get started? Use our writing frames to help you along the way, including our accessibility guide so we can reach as many readers as possible. Writing Frames > Submit! All done? Complete our form below to submit your article! Submission Form > Home: Recent News CONTACT US Name Email Message Submit Thanks for submitting! BUY YOUR SU MEMBERSHIP HERE! Home: Instagram Home: Contact

  • News5

    Welcome Week Click through our articles below to get all the tips for staying on top of your studies, guides for experiencing some culture in Nottingham and anecdotes for new and current language students. NEW POST! CHINA'S "DEMOGRAPHIC TIME BOMB": TOO LITTLE, TOO LATE? 1 2 3 4 5 1 ... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 ... 100

  • Travel | Lingo Magazine

    Travel Go globetrotting with our exclusive travel pieces. From year abroad anecdotes to raving recommendations, it can all be found right here. NEW POST! YEAR ABROAD TALES: WORKING IN AN ART GALLERY ON THE ESTONIAN-RUSSIAN BORDER 11 Jun 2024 Year Abroad Tales: Working in an art gallery on the Estonian-Russian border Juliet shares her experience working at an eclectic art residence in Narva, Estonia, during her year abroad. Read More 11 Apr 2024 Exploring the history of the Vikings in Scandinavia, Part 2 – Stockholm & Copenhagen In the second part of their article, Aidan, a final year Hispanic Studies & History student with a love for all things Anglo-Saxon and Viking, shares the best places to explore the incredible history of the Vikings in Stockholm and Copenhagen. Read More 26 Mar 2024 Staycations: What Does the UK Have to Offer? We're all going on a summer holiday! Emma recommends some of her top staycation destinations for a jolly holiday here in the UK. Read More 26 Mar 2024 Exploring the history of the Vikings in Scandinavia, Part 1 – Oslo Aidan, a final year Hispanic Studies & History student with a love for all things Anglo-Saxon and Viking, shares their recommendations for the best places to explore the incredible history of the Vikings in Scandinavia in this two-part article. First up: Oslo Read More 9 Feb 2024 How Artificial Intelligence is Revolutionising the Tourism Experience Discover how AI is reshaping the world of travel, offering personalized recommendations, optimized route planning, and enhanced customer service. From predictive pricing to language translation apps, AI is breaking down barriers, fostering cultural sensitivity, and ensuring smart luggage solutions for a safer and more enjoyable journey. Read More 8 Feb 2024 In the middle of nowhere, but on the way to somewhere! During my road trip around America, I tried to get to Cadillac Ranch in Texas. The only thing between me and the Cadillacs was a ghost town in Oklahoma, an angry evangelical, and the great emptiness of America. Read More 1 2 3 4 5 1 ... 1 2 3 4 5 6 ... 6 Meet the Editor

  • The Forgotten Victims of the Holocaust | Lingo Magazine

    The Forgotten Victims of the Holocaust Olivia Marshall Monday, 17 June 2024 With the arrival of Pride Month, Olivia reflects on those throughout history who have suffered due to their sexual orientation. Gay men living under National Socialism are often forgotten when remembering those who were persecuted by the Nazis. CW: mentions of the Holocaust and homophobia The gay scene flourished in the Weimar Republic in the late 1800s, despite the introduction of Paragraph 175 into German law in 1871 to prohibit sexual acts between men. The government almost repealed the law and ordered the police not to enforce it, meaning that Berlin had over 100 gay bars and until 1933, Germany was the country with the largest public gay population in the world. Under National Socialism (1933-1945), Paragraph 175 was made stricter, and the most severe prison sentence was increased to 10 years. The Nazis shut down gay bars and meeting spots, and in 1936, a Reich Office was founded to combat homosexuality. The Nazis saw homosexuality in men as a disease and believed that it was a threat to Germany’s birth rate. On the other hand, they believed that lesbians could easily be persuaded or forced to bear children and thus carry on the German race. Male homosexuality went against the ideals of virility and masculinity that were at the heart of the Nazi regime, but that didn’t apply to lesbians, meaning they weren’t considered to be such a threat. During National Socialism, over 100,000 gay men were arrested, around 50,000 of whom were sentenced to prison. In some cases, detained men could be released early if they agreed to be castrated. During this period, prosecutions increased tenfold. Between 5,000 and 15,000 gay men were sent to concentration camps. In the camps, the Nazis used different coloured triangles on prisoners’ uniforms to easily identify why they were imprisoned. Gay men were given a pink triangle, which has since been reclaimed as a symbol of the LGBT liberation movement. It is said that gay prisoners were treated more harshly than any other group and they were often beaten by other prisoners because of their pink triangle. They worked longer hours than other prisoners and were subjected to more physical labour. This is because the Nazis believed that hard work would make them heterosexual. The Nazis also experimented on the gay men imprisoned in the camps to attempt to ‘turn’ them heterosexual. These experiments included testosterone injections, castration, and forced visits to prostitutes. Two thirds of gay men sent to concentration camps died – a far higher figure than the average mortality rate in the camps. After being released from the camps, most men did not talk about their experiences. As Paragraph 175 had not been changed, they were still considered criminals, and many even had to serve prison sentences immediately after their release from concentration camps. Paragraph 175 was not relaxed until 1968 in East Germany and 1969 in West Germany and was not fully repealed until 1994. Germany did not recognise gay prisoners as victims of the Nazis, and they were therefore not entitled to reparations like other victims were. The victims could not speak out for fear of being arrested again up until the point where homosexuality was legalised, but even then, they feared being judged due to public opinion. Many survivors died before homosexuality became more accepted in society and so didn’t have a chance to share their stories. With changing perceptions around being gay, these victims are being commemorated more, and a memorial dedicated to them opened in Berlin in 2008. However, they are still not as known about and talked about as other groups of Holocaust victims. During Pride Month, it is important to reflect upon those who were and still are oppressed for their sexuality, and to remember the gay men who were persecuted and imprisoned under National Socialism. About the Author Related Articles The Forgotten Victims of the Holocaust Olivia Marshall Copyright free images via Unsplash. For more content, follow us on Instagram , and like our Facebook page for more articles and information on how to join the Lingo Team. Have an article ready to send in? Submit it here . Tags: pride month history Categories: Global Affairs Share: Let us know what you think 3.0 150 Article ratings average rating is 3 out of 5, based on 150 votes, Article ratings WRITE A COMMENT Thanks for submitting a comment! Barbara Dawson average rating is 3 out of 5 Lovely tasty dish. Try it you won’t be disappointed. Time Published Aunty Liz average rating is 3 out of 5 Very tasty and cheap. I often have this for tea! Time Published BETTS average rating is 3 out of 5 Being a bilingual family (French mother and British father,) living in France I thought your article was extremely interesting . Have you research on bilingualism ? It seems that when the mother is British and the father French and they both live in France their children seem to be more bilingual than when the mother is French and the father is British . This is what we called mother tongue , isn't it ? Time Published Niamh average rating is 3 out of 5 Such an interesting article! Time Published LOAD MORE

  • Culture | Lingo Magazine

    Culture Art. Music. Film. Food. Books. Immerse yourself in rich and diverse elements from countries all over the world. NEW POST! THE BEESTON FILM FESTIVAL: HIGHLIGHTING THE TRUTHS OF WOMANHOOD IN FILM 8 May 2024 The Beeston Film Festival: Highlighting the Truths of Womanhood in Film A synopsis of my favourite short films from the Women's Voices sections at The Beeston Film Festival Read More 2 May 2024 Promises (African Voices): A Variety Pack Review from Beeston Film Festival A review of Promises (African Voices), a Beeston Film Festival short film variety pack spotlighting a selection of excellent African cinema: Climate in the Minds of Artists, Hearts of Bwindi, Muna, Een Saam (Farther), I Promise you Paradise, & Father's Day. Read More 27 Apr 2024 Finding the Light: Reviewing a Beeston Film Festival Variety Pack Hamster, Tethered, Luminarians, Light of My Life, Shaking Hands with the Devil, Free Spirits. A quickfire review of the Finding the Light variety pack at the Beeston Film Festival. Read More 26 Apr 2024 Passing over Pesach Rachel discusses the traditions and history of Pesach (Passover) and shares her personal experiences growing up celebrating this religious holiday. Read More 5 Apr 2024 The Wonderful World of Studio Ghibli After having watched basically every Ghibli movie out there, Charlie has come to tell you why you need to watch them, and to tell you all about what's behind the curtain in this Japanese animation studios creation of wonder. Read More 5 Apr 2024 Culture Spotlight: Capoeira Society We sat down with Billy Nayani and Qaa’sim Uhuru, Capoeira Society’s President and Instructor, to find out more about one of the University of Nottingham’s newest societies and the incredible art of capoeira. Read More 1 2 3 4 5 1 ... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 9 Meet the Editor Holly is our 2023/24 Culture Editor. A final year English and French student, Holly is interested in languages and cultures, with a particular interest in film. For her, writing for Lingo is a way to enjoy this further and be a bit more purposeful with her interests, find and share new things!

  • Year Abroad Tales: Working in an art gallery on the Estonian-Russian border | Lingo Magazine

    Year Abroad Tales: Working in an art gallery on the Estonian-Russian border Juliet Kennedy Tuesday, 11 June 2024 Juliet shares her experience working at an eclectic art residence in Narva, Estonia, during her year abroad. A month into my time in the frozen, still, city of Narva, nestled a little too cosily on the border between Russia and Estonia, I began to sense that overwhelming feeling of things being a little too slow, and a little too quiet. With winter looming, days drawing shorter and classes finishing at 12:30 I was left with the bewildering question of what next? In this quiet and sleepy city, how could I possibly fill three months? I had tentatively googled ‘art galleries, Narva’, keeping my hopes low because so far all I had seen were endless apartment blocks and abandoned playgrounds. But then, I stumbled across NART. It was an art residency, where artists from all over the world would come to complete a period of time working on a project inspired by Narva and its surroundings. After emailing in the morning, by that afternoon I was chatting with the director and assistant about their visions, goals for the space, what they do, what I do, being young in Narva, their staff, their artists… I felt inspired by the city, a feeling which I had been searching for amongst long Russian language classes and bowls of hot cabbage soup. The residency was huge. It spanned an entire manor house which was divided into studio flats for artists, museum spaces for the public, an exhibition room, kitchens, and messy studios with concrete walls. It was striking, with its English-style red brick. It stood, proud and alone, like something from an Emily Brontë novel on the street Joala 18. It stood out as one of the few buildings that survived the devastation of Narva during World War II, a city where 98% of its infrastructure was destroyed by bombs. Having spent my recent weeks living in one of the many Khrushchevki , apartment buildings built during the Soviet Union, it was a welcome change to work and exist in a space that was old and grand and full of a much deeper sense of history. The ‘living area’ of the residence The residence was, at its construction, the house for the director of Kreenholm Manufacture (another interesting building in Narva, a huge abandoned factory that straddles the river between Estonia and Russia), and since then has been a schoolhouse, a cinema, and now an art residence. One Friday night I helped to set up a party that was being organized by some of the residents, as one of them had made a light projection that he wanted to show off, along with a DJ set. I remember running up and down the stairs of the sprawling house, searching for mismatched glasses hidden deep in kitchen cupboards to put at the homemade bar. It was like a maze of spiral staircases, adorned with photographs and paintings. Artists were making Moroccan egg sandwiches to sell at the party, along with ginger cocktails; another was offering a flash of tattoos in the living room; and I remember texting my friend to say, hey, come tonight, there will be eggs, ginger vodka, and tattoos. She was, naturally, quite confused. But it's in that kind of madness that I remember and love NART. I ended up working on the reception desk, sitting in the airy gallery and knitting whilst I waited for the odd visitor. And when they came, I would express, in convoluted Russian, that there was indeed an interesting exhibition just through those doors but, I can’t really explain it to you because the whole thing is about oddly specific and personal Estonian words which I can’t actually read. I got a lot of strange looks from locals, but I was just happy to be surrounded by beautiful architecture and artists who slipped in and out of the grand front doors to smoke a cigarette, to do their grocery shopping, to just walk around in the large gardens and snowy air. I won’t forget the two Japanese artists, Reico Motohara and Kaori Sato. They were photographers who came to Narva with the task of completing ‘’kitchen stories’’, a photography exhibition and a cookbook. They reached out to locals, extending invitations for dinner to delve deeper into the local culture and cuisine, aiming to share heartfelt moments around a dinner table in a typical Soviet apartment. The culminating exhibition showcased a curated collection of photographs featuring classic dishes such as borscht and fish, capturing convivial moments in kitchens, accompanied by stories shared by locals about their families and histories. They returned to Japan with a collection of recipes to print and publish in a cookbook. Their exhibition and talk ended with a kind-of dinner party, where all guests were invited to bring a dish, exotic to Narva, and reminiscent of their home. Reico and Kaori made a delicious spread of sushi, and my friend and I decided to make and bring banana bread. We will never forget the moment that we saw a curious local from Narva pick up a slice of the sweet, chocolatey banana bread, only to embellish it with soy sauce, salmon, seaweed, and cucumber. Perhaps it was our oversight to place the bread next to the sushi. Sushi and other homemade dishes at the exhibition opening The residence, upstairs, boasted a large, old fashioned cinema room. There was one night where I was at the reception desk welcoming visitors and guiding them to where the film would screen. As it started rolling in came a few locals, who I had already seen around a lot. We got chatting and, after having them poke fun at my Russian and answering the usual slurry of questions that aim to understand why I would choose Russian, and did I realize how hard it was, they pulled out a bottle of some kind of home brewed vodka, from under their jacket. It was now December and my time in Narva was coming to an end. So, in a poignant and only natural farewell to the city that had taught me so much, we sat, taking shots of the bitter, burning liquid, whilst I was taught a vital, albeit unconventional crash course in Russian profanities, that I would ‘absolutely need’ to navigate life’s challenges. Amidst Narva’s frozen tranquillity and political tensions, NART emerges as a flurry of art, culture and vibrant personalities. The feeling of a cold day, four months on and long departed from Estonia, sometimes takes me back to the reception desk of the residence, the lofty ceilings and dimly lit rooms, the chattering of artists, and the sound of echoing footsteps on tiled floors. About the Author Related Articles Taiwan Diaries: Quarantine Rosie Loyd YEAR ABROAD TALES: the highs and lows of au pairing Mhairi MacLeod Taiwan Diaries: Freedom Rosie Loyd Images provided by Juliet Kennedy. For more content, follow us on Instagram , and like our Facebook page for more articles and information on how to join the Lingo Team. Have an article ready to send in? Submit it here . Tags: Art Russian travel Juliet Kennedy Year Abroad Culture Categories: Year Abroad Tales Share: Let us know what you think 3.0 150 Article ratings average rating is 3 out of 5, based on 150 votes, Article ratings WRITE A COMMENT Thanks for submitting a comment! Barbara Dawson average rating is 3 out of 5 Lovely tasty dish. Try it you won’t be disappointed. Time Published Aunty Liz average rating is 3 out of 5 Very tasty and cheap. I often have this for tea! Time Published BETTS average rating is 3 out of 5 Being a bilingual family (French mother and British father,) living in France I thought your article was extremely interesting . Have you research on bilingualism ? It seems that when the mother is British and the father French and they both live in France their children seem to be more bilingual than when the mother is French and the father is British . This is what we called mother tongue , isn't it ? Time Published Niamh average rating is 3 out of 5 Such an interesting article! Time Published LOAD MORE

  • Interview with a Polyglot | Lingo Magazine

    Interview with a Polyglot Charlie Bodsworth Monday, 10 June 2024 Ever wondered how someone can manage learning and speaking multiple languages at once? Our Language & Linguistics editor, Charlie, got talking to UoN alum, Emily, to figure out just that. Whether you’re monolingual or bilingual, I’m sure you’ve wondered, like I have, how polyglots can fit so many languages into just one brain! To get some insight into the world of the most avid language learners, I chatted with Emily Ridyard, a UoN Modern Languages alum who speaks three languages and has been learning two more on top of that! Charlie: Can you introduce yourself, please? Emily: Yeah! I'm Emily. I speak English as my first language, but I've also learnt French, Spanish, and Russian. During my degree, I did a bit of Serbian. And I'm currently learning Ukrainian. C: How does that tie in with your current work? E: I work with refugees. I work a day and a half per week at St Nic's Church, leading English classes for refugees who are looking to learn English as a way to get involved in British society. Two and a half days a week, I'm at a charity called Refugee Roots, where I support refugees and asylum seekers with their practical needs. C: How did you learn each of your languages? E: My family moved to Belgium when I was three. We ended up staying for five years. I went to an international school, so my schooling was done in English, but we had French classes almost every day so I had a decent grasp of French by the time I left Belgium. At secondary school, I continued French and also picked up Spanish. It happened that my French teacher had a degree in French and Russian, so she asked the school whether she could teach GCSE Russian classes after school and the school agreed! I already knew that I loved languages, so I was like: “yes please!” C: Was there anything in particular that gave you that spark to learn languages? E: In Belgium, going to an international school, all my peers spoke multiple languages. I remember being like “I want to speak all these really cool languages!” So, I would take a little notebook out at play time, and make my friends tell me words in their languages, and write them down. I was committed! Having that appreciation of other cultures and languages really young is what made me want to stick with it. C: I feel like a lot of people in the UK don't lean into that. Why do you think there are so many people that never learn a second language or have a lot of difficulty with it? E: In other countries across the world, being good at language learning is the only way to access the wider world. And because so many other people speak English, it can lead to either intentional or unintentional laziness. I also think that the school system in the UK isn't set up for language learning. It's not presented as very appealing. When I was on my year abroad as an English teaching assistant, one of their topics was superheroes, and they were watching clips from Marvel films! That contrasts so sharply with the topics I did in school, such as health. C: How would you say your languages interact in your head? Do you think or talk to yourself in any of your languages? Do you get them muddled up? E: When I was in France, I was speaking French at work and at home. That was when I was probably the most absorbed in it. I could find myself thinking and dreaming and living life in French. When I left university, I would’ve said that French was my strongest language, but in my work, I speak with a lot of Latin American asylum seekers, so I now have much better Spanish. I definitely get Spanish and French mixed up because they're just very similar. When I try to speak French, sometimes just random words come out in Spanish! C: What do you think is one of the biggest language mix ups you've ever had, between languages or just in one? E: Well, both Russian and Spanish use the sound “ ee ” for “and”, but it's written very differently. So, “ ee ” is written in Russian a bit like a capital N backwards. And in Spanish, it's written with a “y”, which is also a letter in the Russian alphabet, but a different sound. I once wrote an entire essay in Russian but accidentally wrote “and” in Spanish every time! C: What would you say are some of the difficulties with some of your weaker languages, Serbian and Ukrainian? Do you struggle to keep them up? E: I've always said, and I think it's true: if you don't use it, you lose it. That's what I’ve found with my Serbian. While I was by no means fluent, I could hold a decent conversation. Now I think I'd really struggle because I haven't used it. Also, I think it's easier when there's lots of media readily available in the target language. Even though I don't speak very much French, I still watch quite a bit of French TV. Whereas for things like Russian or Ukrainian, it's perhaps a little bit harder to access media. C: That makes a lot of sense. Do you have any advice for others who want to learn multiple second languages? E: Just go for it! There is sometimes this natural hesitation about it, but once you've learnt one language, it only gets easier. Even if you’re learning something completely different to a language you already know, you've got that discipline and those rhythms in place. It's not as scary as sometimes people paint it to be. I also just encourage people to do things in a way that is fun and engaging! About the Author Related Articles Interview with a Polyglot Charlie Bodsworth Copyright free images via Unsplash . For more content, follow us on Instagram , and like our Facebook page for more articles and information on how to join the Lingo Team. Have an article ready to send in? Submit it here . Tags: language interview language learning polyglot Charlie Bodsworth Categories: Interview Share: Let us know what you think 3.0 150 Article ratings average rating is 3 out of 5, based on 150 votes, Article ratings WRITE A COMMENT Thanks for submitting a comment! Barbara Dawson average rating is 3 out of 5 Lovely tasty dish. Try it you won’t be disappointed. Time Published Aunty Liz average rating is 3 out of 5 Very tasty and cheap. I often have this for tea! Time Published BETTS average rating is 3 out of 5 Being a bilingual family (French mother and British father,) living in France I thought your article was extremely interesting . Have you research on bilingualism ? It seems that when the mother is British and the father French and they both live in France their children seem to be more bilingual than when the mother is French and the father is British . This is what we called mother tongue , isn't it ? Time Published Niamh average rating is 3 out of 5 Such an interesting article! Time Published LOAD MORE

  • Students Protest the (Western) World Over | Lingo Magazine

    Students Protest the (Western) World Over Holly Cromwell Saturday, 25 May 2024 Student protests in the US in support of Palestine have grabbed international media attention, both from traditional new outlets and through the slow seep of videos in the TikTok ecosystem. The role of student journalists and social media in local and global politics has never been quite so clear. Holly explores this and examines the ongoing events. Student protests in the US have gained international attention. Whether it be through traditional news or the slow seep of videos within the TikTok ecosystem, I’m sure almost everyone is aware of the ongoing situation. The role of student journalists and social media in local and global politics has never been quite so clear. What may not have been so clear, however, is that the students in Universities of Atlanta, Yale, Havard, New York, North Carolina, Columbia and Mississippi, as well as so many others, were not alone for very long – as students from all over the world have come together to protest in support of Palestine against the Israel-Hamas war. Student protests have sprung up across the globe: the famous Science Po and La Sorbonne in Paris, as well as Lyon, in France; Leipzig in Germany; Lausanne, Geneva and Zurich in Switzerland; and Trinity College in Dublin. And, since the 11th of May, our very own Nottingham Students for Palestine have set up camp outside of the Advanced Manufacturing Building on Jubilee campus, asking, like many other protesters, for their university to cease affiliations with Israel. Not all student protests take the form of encampments like the ones we have seen in the UK and US: some are occupations, sit-ins, marches, or simple demonstrations. Despite this variety, the protests all seem to be on the same intensity across the continent. Police have been involved across Europe, with 86 people arrested at La Sorbonne, Paris, and 169 in Amsterdam, where students created barricades out of university furniture around their encampments to push back against police. Students were arrested at many of these protests, but some countries have had more measured reactions than others. Where in the US, the police were seen using teargas and pepper balls on unarmed students (making the University of Arizona now infamous on social media), those in Amsterdam used batons to charge students and smash their tents. As a breath of fresh air, however, in Belgium, the prime minister Alexander de Croo, has said that if he were their age, he would have joined them. In the UK, Rishi Sunak has called vice-chancellors of British universities to an emergency meeting at Downing Street, to discuss these university encampments and alleged “rising anti-semitism” on campuses. His message to those protesting was: “The right to free speech does not include the right to harass people or incite violence.” Some of those same vice-chancellors have since accused him of inflaming the situation, although one took the opposite stance. Hundreds of staff members from Oxford, Cambridge and Edinburgh have signed open letters claiming solidarity with these students, echoing the chains of faculty members protecting student encampments at New York University. Something not highlighted enough in articles on the subject is that although these protests erupted through April and May, they are set to continue towards the end of June in some places. Whilst student activists protest, student journalists cover the events at the risk of their own safety, particularly in those campuses facing institutional violence. Many of those campuses that have seen these encampments have also experienced certain levels of police violence used to disperse them, though most not on the level of Arizona. Most countries have their own term calendar, but, given the relative ubiquity of the summer holidays, this is a universally anxiety-inducing time for students. With exam seasons and graduation periods looming, the protests have already caused significant impacts. Whilst there’s a long history of student protests, (protests at Oxford and Paris date back to 1209 and 1229 respectively, from before English even resembled English), any society committee knows that it is difficult to motivate students to do anything at this time of year. The fact that these protests are not only global, but are continuing despite the efforts of the institutions and the police, as well as the slow grind of grades and expectations, is pretty remarkable. An incomplete list of campus protests for Palestine in Europe alone: Austria: Vienna Belgium: Gand, Brussels, Liège, Anvers (the free university of Brussels and the Catholic university of Leuven) Denmark: Copenhagen Finland: Helsinki Germany: Berlin, La Freie Universität de Berlin, (the other large campus of the German Capital) Dresden, Leipzig and Brêmen. Greece: Athens Ireland: Trinity College Dublin Italy: La Sapienza, Milan, Naples, Turin, Bologne, Padoue Netherlands: Amsterdam, Maastricht, Nimègue, Eindhoven, Utrecht, Groningue, Leiden Norway: Bergen Portugal: Lisbon Spain: Valencia, Barcelona, Madrid, Pampelune, Bilbao, Séville. Sweden: Lund, Stockholm Switzerland: Geneva, Bâle, Berne, Fribourg, Zurich UK: Newcastle, Leeds, Lancaster, Cambridge, Oxford, Edinburgh, Goldsmith, Kings College London, Nottingham, Bristol, Warwick, York, London School of Economics, Queen Mary School of London. About the Author Related Articles 'A Victory for Feminism': How France Made the Right to Abortion Part of its Constitution Charlie Bodsworth Cannabis Legalisation in Germany Olivia Marshall Ladies Lounge: The Story of One Man’s Entitlement and Why That’s The Point Holly Cromwell Copyright free images via Unsplash. For more content, follow us on Instagram , and like our Facebook page for more articles and information on how to join the Lingo Team. Have an article ready to send in? Submit it here . Tags: protest student international global affairs Holly Cromwell Categories: Global Affairs Share: Let us know what you think 3.0 150 Article ratings average rating is 3 out of 5, based on 150 votes, Article ratings WRITE A COMMENT Thanks for submitting a comment! LOAD MORE

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